EFFECTIVE WEED SPRAYING

  • Add a wetting agent to your sprays; Try McGregor’s Spray Stick - this will increase the efficiency of the spray with better foliage coverage and penetration.
  • Spraying in windy conditions is wasteful, ineffective and a health risk to you.  Windy conditions causes spray to drift, giving you spotty coverage and the chance that it will land on the plants you don’t want to kill.
  • Play it safe, wear protective clothing, gloves and a respiratory mask when spraying or mixing chemicals.
  • Give the spray a chance to work, make sure that it is not going to rain for at least 5 hours; rain will reduce the effectiveness of the product used.
  • Old chemicals do lose their effectiveness over the years – date the bottle when you purchase it.
  • There is no need to double the dose- the manufacture has worked out what is needed, if you aren’t getting the results you want, and then it is probably more about how and when you are spraying.
  • Don’t invent brews by mixing chemicals together this is a dangerous practice and if something does go wrong then you have no rights when it comes to sorting any compensation for damage to your sprayer or garden.            
  • Unused spray left in the sprayer will start to breakdown.  Empty, rinse the bowl out with water, fill it again with water and flush it through the tube and nozzle, empty and it is ready for the next time.
  • Check the nozzle on the end of the spray wand, debris that gets stuck here will block and distort the spray flow. Remove and wash under the tap.
  • Keep  separate sprayers one for weed killers and one for insecticides and fungicides – mark them clearly
  • Keep a separate set of mixing and measuring tools, mark as a poison so they will not be inadvertently used for something else.  Store them with your chemicals, away from children.